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Britain Has Surrendered to the Loss of Its Children

Abadnonned schoolBy Anne Dachel

(UK) Bath and North East Somerset Council: ‘We are all on the autistic spectrum’

Britain has surrendered to the loss of its children. They’ve given up without a fight, much like the U.S. has done. Nothing could make that fact clearer than what happened at a meeting of the Bath and North East Somerset Council on September 13th when the subject was autism.

The meeting was covered in Somerset Live  in a piece entitled, Motion backed to ensure people with autism in Bath and North East Somerset get the help they need.

“People with autism” makes it sound like autism effects all ages equally, yet the article was almost exclusively about children with autism and their needs.

The words “child” and “children” were both used throughout the piece.

“He said he knows of a child who needed…”

“…children waiting years for a diagnosis.”

‘Every child deserves an equal chance…’

‘We have to get children suspected of having autism …’

The only reference to adults on the spectrum was from one council member who mentioned that his partner recently was diagnosed with Asperger’s (as if an independent adult with a claim of high functioning autism is comparable to the non-verbal, aggressive 16 year old still in diapers).

‘We are all on the autistic spectrum’

Bath council member Tim Ball went so far as to declare, ‘We are all on the autistic spectrum at some point’—a  statement that showed he either has no understanding of what huge numbers of parents are dealing with, or he’s trying to make autism into a normal and acceptable part of the human condition. 

It seemed like almost everyone on the council had a personal experience with autism. Ball even remarked, ‘Each one of us knows someone with autism.

Nowhere in the piece was the current autism rate mentioned or the fact that it’s been dramatically increasing over the past two decades.

The meeting was about taking action regarding autism. No one sounded worried that the numbers might go beyond two percent of children, instead councilors merely called for better support, shortening the waiting lists for a diagnosis, improving services, and recognizing autism in the criminal justice system.

One councilor chastised those present:

‘In the future people will look back at what we do today and wonder how we could be so cruel. As our understanding improves through time, people will think how wrong we were.’

So cruel’

It seems that society has been remiss in providing for this significant disabled population. We’ve actually been wrong and cruel in our treatment of autistic people.  One councilor was “really angry” over fact that Asperger’s as a diagnosis has been around since 1944, but still today, it takes years for an adult to get a diagnosis.

No one asked even basis questions about why autism was such a problem now. Instead the council’s worries were about adolescents with autism ending up in the prison system and misbehaving children being denied bus passes.

The message was clear: AUTISM HAS ALWAYS BEEN HERE, we just haven’t recognized it. Once we make all kinds of accommodations, everything will be fine.

My reply to the councilor who predicted that ‘In the future people will look back at what we do today and wonder how we could be so cruel’ is this:

In the future people will look back at what we do today and wonder how we could have been so wrong to not recognize that autism is a manmade epidemic of recent origin.

MORE QUESTIONS

Why didn’t anyone demand to see the same rate of classic autism in every age group, not just children?

Why didn’t anyone sound an alarm over regressive alarm where healthy, normally developing children suddenly lose learned skills and end up with an autism label?

Why didn’t anyone ask why the rate continues to worsen year after year, while officials can never figure out if that means more children actually have autism?

The Bath and Somerset Council may not see a growing crisis here, but the signs are everywhere in the press all over Britain.

Take a look at what’s really happening to children with autism and other neurological disability in the U.K. Special education needs are overwhelming British schools and the cost is enormous.   SEE THE STORIES BELOW.

How can all this be happening in a country that purports to care about the disabled?

In Lincolnshire autistic preschoolers have been ignored.

In Surrey 300-400 more special needs places will be needed in the next two years. These numbers KEEP GROWING.

In Weston there’s a new SPED school because of “an increased need.”

In Sutton they have the highest number of SPED student in a decade, and 28% of kids with a SPED plan have autism.

In Northamptonshire they’re building a new school for kids with autism and other related disabilities. “The new school is much-needed and will meet the rising demand for additional special school places…”

In Wolverhampton they’re adding more SPED places in three schools at a cost of $720K in US dollars.

The Suffolk County Council expects SPED numbers to increase by 28% in the next  couple of years.

The South Ayrshire Council is spending $5.2M in US dollars for more SPED places in local schools.

Norwich just spent $13K in US dollars for a new sensory room for SPED students. It’s for kids with “limited communication skills.”

Bristol is also building a new school for dozens of autistic students because of the demand for places “for Bristol's most needy children.”

How long can this continue?? Incredibly, everywhere in England people simply look the other way.

Sept 14, 2018, (UK) Grimsby Live: CQC expresses 'significant concerns' regarding North East Lincolnshire SEND services 

Significant concerns have been raised over the quality of the disability and special educational needs service in North East Lincolnshire following an inspection.

The Care Quality Commission found "significant areas of weakness", saying local leaders have a "superficial understanding" of the needs of children and young people with special needs….

Inspectors found that the healthy child programme for children up to the age of five "is not delivered in an effective way" with too few face to face contacts and new birth visits were not always completed within statutory timescales. Two to two-and-a-half year checks are not completed in a timely way….

Parents of children with autism had previously hit out at the local authority for not providing diagnosis for children under five at all….

Sept 14, 2018, (UK) East Anglican Daily Times: ‘It just seems a bit hopeless’ – family’s desperate plea for autistic son’s education

A family who claim their autistic son has not had suitable education since April have described their plight for appropriate provision as “hopeless”.

Chris and Karen Stride-Noble moved to Lowestoft from Surrey in October last year with their nine-year-old son Joseph, who was diagnosed as autistic at the age of three, and daughter Charlotte, two. Joseph suffers from behavioural issues and high anxiety and had been educated at a special school in Surrey.

The youngster was being taught at The Landing, a facility in Lowestoft which provides education for children with higher functioning autism, but the family said his inability to cope with the class sizes and his social needs meant he struggled to thrive.

A meeting with the school resulted in an outside tutor for three hours a day providing specialist education and practical skills such as cooking, but the family claims Joseph has not had full time education for more than five months.

The couple say work to get him into other schools resulted in him being turned away – either because they could not meet his needs, or because they were full.

 “One of the worrying things is we are aware that there are so many people out there [wanting specialist places]. It just seems a bit hopeless.”

Their plight comes after a cabinet report published last week highlighted the huge demand on special education needs services in the county, with education chiefs stating that a further 300-400 SEN places are needed in the next two years alone to meet demand – the equivalent of three or four special schools. …

The number of children and young people with special educational needs in Suffolk is growing, mirroring a national trend.

The council hopes to create these places as soon as possible with the help of a development panel….

Jack Abbott, Labour education spokesman, said: “Sadly, this story isn’t unique but one of many. I have an ever increasing number of families contacting me out of desperation as they have nowhere left to turn.

“We are in the midst of an SEN crisis here in Suffolk and for too long the Tories have turned a blind eye to the growing and desperate need of children and their families and have failed to provide critical support to schools and teachers.

The number of children and young people with special educational needs in Suffolk is growing, mirroring a national trend.

The council hopes to create these places as soon as possible with the help of a development panel….

Jack Abbott, Labour education spokesman, said: “Sadly, this story isn’t unique but one of many. I have an ever increasing number of families contacting me out of desperation as they have nowhere left to turn.

“We are in the midst of an SEN crisis here in Suffolk and for too long the Tories have turned a blind eye to the growing and desperate need of children and their families and have failed to provide critical support to schools and teachers.

Sept 14, 2018, (UK) Weston Mercury: Councillor’s concern over district’s plan for special education needs school

… Building a new school for children with special educational needs could cause academies to become ‘less inclusive’, according to a North Somerset councillor.

Councillor Tom Leimdorfer is worried about the increasing number of children requiring alternative education and has questioned how North Somerset will be able to provide for these pupils in future….

The council’s report says it is working on submitting a bid by October 15 to win Government funding for a new special or alternative provision school from the Department for Education….

He says there is a ‘tremendous amount’ of planning being put into alternative provision to combat the growing number of children not attending school.

Cllr Leimdorfer added: “Some of it is in answer to Ofsted but quite a lot of it is in answer to what seems to be an increased need….

“Even if we have the resources for a new social, emotional and mental health school, and more alternative provision, is it in fact going to end up making it easier for mainstream schools and academies to be less inclusive?”…

The council is also exploring the need for a new primary school in the centre of Weston and completing a 300-pupil expansion project with Priory Community School by the autumn.

North Somerset Council also wants to build a £4million primary school in Yatton’s North End.

An opening date of either September 2020 or 2021 has been set for the school which will have capacity for 210 pupils.

 

Sept 13, 2018, (UK) Sutton Guardian: Pupils with SEN in Sutton requiring extra support at 11-year high 

The number of children and young people across Sutton needing additional special educational needs (SEN) support is the highest it has been in 11 years.

Official data for 2018 shows there are 1,318 pupils across Sutton who require extra help – a year-on-year increase since 2014 – according to the Department for Education (DfE).

But those who have an education, health and care (EHC) plan or statement, based on where they go to school, is the most since 2007.

It comes as the number of pupils with SEN has risen for a second consecutive year in England, from 1.24 million to 1.27 million.

And 253,680 children and young people across the country have a statement of SEN, or EHC, which is an increase of 11,495 since January last year.

The most common primary types of need have also remained the same from 2017.

Moderate learning difficulty is the most prevalent for additional needs support, at 24 percent, while 28.2 percent of those with an EHC plan or statement have autism spectrum disorder….

 

Sept 13, 2018, (UK) Northamptonshire Telegraph: Trust announces location of new special school in Rushden

A new special school for students with learning difficulties is set to open in Rushden in 2020.

Friars Academy Trust, which runs Friars Academy in Wellingborough, is delighted to announce the location of Friars East Free School, their new 145-place special secondary school in Rushden….

When the new school building is complete, it will offer places to 145 children aged 11 to 19 with special educational needs.

Friars East Free School will cater for students with moderate learning difficulties to severe learning difficulties, including students with autism….

John Turnbull, chairman of Friars Multi-Academy Trust and Suzzanne Ijewsky, executive headteacher of Friars Multi-Academy Trust, said: “We are delighted that a site has now been secured for Friars East Free School.

“The new school is much-needed and will meet the rising demand for additional special school places in Northamptonshire….

Sept 13, 2018, (UK) Wolverhampton Express and Star:  Three schools to expand in Wolverhampton to cater for special needs pupils

 

Three schools in Wolverhampton will expand creating an extra 54 places for special needs pupils.

Penn Hall School, Tettenhall Wood School and Warstones Primary will take dozens of extra children under the Wolverhampton Council plans.

It comes after the authority revealed it spent £3.28 million [$4.3M US dollars]  last year sending youngsters miles away for education as the city sees a ‘marked increase’ in pupils with special needs….

It would mean fewer youngsters with autism, learning difficulties and physical disabilities will travel miles out of area for costly school placements….

The council said 17 per cent of primary school pupils with a hearing impairment were forced to enrol at schools out of the city in July.

The proposals are expected to cost about £550,000, [$720,000 US dollars] which will be covered by Government funding.

Growing pressures for places have seen the number of pupils on roll at special needs schools ‘exceed registered capacities’, the council said.

Tettenhall Wood School, in Regis Road, has seen a 91 per cent increase in pupil numbers over the past five years – rising from 58 in 2011/2012 to 111 in the last academic year, although it is only registered to have 102 pupils on roll.

The plans would also see the school lower its entry age from five to four to help meet an 'marked increase' in pupils with autism' in Wolverhampton.

Places at Tettenhall Wood School are now set to increase to 120 under the plans, while places will increase from 76 to 100 at Penn Hall School.

Penn Hall School would also extend its support to pupils with learning difficulties and autism and not just children with physical disabilities at its Vicarage Road base….

Sept 13, 2018, (UK) Heart: Suffolk to expand special needs education 

Suffolk County Council is taking steps to improve support for children and young adults with special educational needs.

The need for specialist help is predicted to rise by 18 per cent over the next couple of years.

It's partly due to population growth and advancements in medicine.

"The range of complex needs is so great, it's not a one-size fits all - there's not one answer," said Gordon Jones, cabinet member for Children's Services, Education and Skills.

A new special school opened in Lowestoft a year ago, and another will open in Ipswich in 2020.

There will also be increased support for services in existing schools.

 

Sept 11, 2018, (UK) Carrick Gazette: Pupils start at new Invergarven School

The education of children and young people with additional support needs in Girvan and South Carrick has been transformed thanks to significant investment from South Ayrshire Council.

The new £4m [$5.2M US dollars] school for primary and secondary children and young people with additional support needs replaces the 1870 building on Henrietta Street and has been built by CBC in the grounds of Girvan Academy.

The school provides spaces for learning and teaching including a sensory room, life skills kitchen, multi-use hall, a rebound therapy trampoline room, hydrotherapy pool and external areas that support outdoor learning. The new school also increases capacity by around a third with 20 children and young people able to be taught at any one time (up from 15 at the old school)….



Sept 11, 2018, (UK) Care Appointments: Government urged to ring fence funding for autistic schoolchildren 

Ministers have been urged to ring fence funding for autistic children so schools can provide properly for them.

Labour's Lloyd Russell-Moyle said autistic children in his Brighton Kemptown constituency were "unable to access proper education".

During Education questions in the Commons, he told MPs that head teachers do not have enough funding to provide support for special educational needs (SEN). …

"When I speak to heads they want to provide support but they don't have the funding for SEN….

Education Minister Nadhim Zahawi replied: "High needs funding for children and young people with complex special educational needs, including those with autism, is now £6 billion [$7.8B US dollars] this year - the highest it has ever been, and an increase from £5 billion [$6.5B US dollars] in 2013.

"We've increased overall funding allocations to local authorities for high needs by £130 million [$170M US dollars] in 2017/18 and £142 million [$185M US dollars] in 18/19 and we will increase this further by £120 million [$157M US dollars] in 2019/20."

 

Sept 11, 2018, (UK) Norwich Evening News: School opens new children’s sensory room

The specialist sensory school matched a £10,000 [$13,000 US dollars] donation to create their new room.

A complex needs school in Norwich has celebrated the opening of a new sensory room….

The school, for pupils aged between three and 19, bought new bespoke equipment to help with their pupils’ disabilities.

Fyfe Johnston, headteacher of Clare School, said: “Eighty per cent of our pupils have sensory needs, with many also having complex medical and learning needs….

“We got to design most of the room, meaning we get to control the environment, and it also meant that we got really good value for money.”

A sensory room is a room designed to develop a person’s sense, through special lighting, music, and objects.

It can also be used as a therapy for children with limited communication skills….

 

Sept 11, 2018, (UK) Ipswich Star: Suffolk to look in detail at special education across the county

Suffolk County Council is to look at ways of increasing the number of places for children with special education needs at a meeting in January.

The council’s cabinet heard that 300-400 extra places were needed for children with special needs in the county by 2020, equating to three to four new schools. …

 “It follows a consultation where we have listened to the views of our service users, partners and providers on the best way to grow our specialist education.”

Opposition Labour spokesman Jack Abbott said it was vital that the council took quick effective action to deal with the shortfall in numbers for SEN services.

Sept 7, 2018, (UK) Bristol Live: School and autism facility to be created despite residents saying it'll have a 'devastating impact' on them

A new primary school and specialist autism facility will be built in Bristol despite claims by residents it would have a “devastating impact” on their lives….

Developing the current site in Withywood Road would cause too much stress for the autistic children, who school bosses say need a purpose-built centre.

Currently 263 pupils, 38 nursery kids and 70 autistic children use the Withywood Road site. The new facility is expected to have 420 primary places, 38 nursery places and 84 places for autistic children….

Parents of autistic children were furious with the decision, saying the current school was so rundown that buckets were being used to collect rainwater from the leaking roof….

At a Bristol City Council planning meeting on Wednesday, September 5, architects showed councillors the revised plans. They included:

Moving the site an extra 1.6-metres away from the houses

But a number of angry residents filled City Hall’s public gallery to protest the application….

 “This is a massive building that’s going onto a tiny bit of land outside our house which will have a devastating impact on our lives," she said….

His backing was echoed by parents of autistic children, who spoke movingly about the need for specialist facilities for Bristol's most needy children….

 “Sadly the current facilities are seriously failing our young people," he said. "Instead of sub-standard porta cabins, these young people need purpose-built facilities to meet their complex needs."

Anne Dachel Is Media Editor for Age of Autism.

Comments

Gayle

The state of the autism epidemic is not NORMAL, it is ABNORMAL as the rate was once 1 in 10,000 and no one ever heard of it because it was such a rare condition. AUTISM=ABNORMAL! There has never been a time in all of human history when we have had so many people diagnosed with autism and it is not natural or normal. We need research to correct the damage done to our children and reverse this abnormal condition.

Hans Litten

Now its the Independents turn to perpetuate the mass murder and poisoning.
Its astounding how we all fell for the lamestream lies.
The orchestrated media messages in perfect unison (who are the controllers ?)

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/uk-children-vaccinations-nhs-decline-measles-meningitis-a8543061.html

Number of children in England being vaccinated reaches six-year low
England is failing to meet the 95 per cent rate recommended by the World Health Organisation

L Land

Washington Post Today:

"At first, the medical establishment was unmoved. When eight to 10 children a year contracted polio, and millions of others were protected, “my feeling was it was a small price to pay,” Walter A. Orenstein, who was director of the U.S. immunization program at the CDC from 1988 to 2004, recalled Friday in an interview."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/david-salamone-who-contracted-polio-from-vaccine-and-helped-spur-changes-in-us-immunization-policy-dies-at-28/2018/09/15/5e86319e-b8f8-11e8-94eb-3bd52dfe917b_story.html?utm_term=.6b2066b5e42e

JT

I felt physically ill when I read the statement: “We are all on the spectrum” ditto when I read the statement in the large autism regression study (forgot the exact name) out of CA: “ Regression is a normal part of childhood.”

No and no.

I used to believe that the “official” stance was due to ignorance or incompetence but now I believe deliberate malfeasance.

Morag

No ! It is not getting accepted or tolerated , and as we used to have to say to the Thurso Pipe Band
doing sommersaults on the bus on the way back to skerray/lamigo with not a pair of pants elastic to share between them either.
If that's all the pharma marketing folk have to show for themselves well we wouldn't suggest they want to be showing "That "to anyone

Grace Green

Hans Litton, but they're failing. The people are getting the message, and the people voting with their feet is the only way we're going to win this. There are more of us than them.

Hans Litten

The Guardian doing its bit to keep the vaccine massacre going ! Sarah Marsh

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/sep/18/take-up-mmr-vaccine-falls-fourth-year-in-a-row-england-measles

Take-up of MMR vaccine falls for fourth year in a row in England
Proportion of children being immunised down to 91.2% as experts warn of measles risk

bob moffit

"Bath council member Tim Ball went so far as to declare, ‘We are all on the autistic spectrum at some point’—a statement that showed he either has no understanding of what huge numbers of parents are dealing with, or he’s trying to make autism into a normal and acceptable part of the human condition."

Council member Tim Ball is just one small example of what has become a global strategy to rationalize their deliberate effort to IGNORE asking or investigating what has CAUSED autism to rise to the levels it has .. wherein global public health bureaucracies, politicians, research universities, and many others .. claim CREDIT for the simple task of becoming AWARE of autism.

Council member Tim Ball went so far as to declare, ‘We are all on the autistic spectrum at some point’—a statement that showed he either has no understanding of what huge numbers of parents are dealing with, or he’s trying to make autism into a normal and acceptable part of the human condition."

Unfortunately .. the AWARENESS strategy could not succeed unless there was a simultaneous … global effort to NORMALIZE what has always been ABNORMAL. The strategy of NORMALIZING ABNORMALITY is critical if your intention is to IGNORE what has CAUSED the ABNORMAL TO SUDDENLY BECOME THE NORMAL.

‘In the future people will look back at what we do today and wonder how we could be so cruel"

Hopefully .. people in the future will look back at what we do today and wonder how did the people we TRUSTED .. allow ABNORMAL TO BECOME NORMAL?


Hans Litten

Would you describe it as a holocaust Anne ?
What is the rate in England John ?
Is it 10%

Where are the vaccine rebels ?

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